All in Ones Revitalize Desktop PCs

Touchscreens, sleek designs and manufacturing innovations spur demand for all in one PCs.

In a world gone mobile, there’s a growing appetite for stationary computers, and sales of so-called all in one desktop PCs have been climbing by double digits according to market researchers.

Touchscreen All in One PC

Innovations such as large touchscreens as seen on this Lenovo all in one PC are making stationary computers more engaging and multi-functional than traditional desktops.

All in ones, or AIOs, integrate computer components with the display and rely on a single power plug. That’s a contrast to traditional desktop PCs with a separate tower and monitor that connect via cable with each requiring its own power source.

“It’s easy to interact with all in ones because they have more features than tower computers,” said Ouyang Jun, an executive director and GM at Lenovo. “Everything is in front of you.”

Industry experts say the recent rise in demand for all in ones is driven by significant cost savings from manufacturing efficiencies and new, more elegant designs. Many of the latest models include touchscreens that may become even more appealing with the release of the touch-oriented Windows 8 operating system later this year.

“I was in Japan about a week and a half ago and pretty much the entire PC market is converted to all in ones,” said Kirk Skaugen, general manager of Intel’s the PC client group in April. “They’re very thin panels and they’re all over the house, and they have integrated TV. That gets exciting when you look forward to voice and gesture (control).”

An estimated 16.4 million all in ones are expected to sell this year, a 20 percent increase from 2011, according to research firm IHS. While total sales remain a fraction of 132.3 million traditional desktop PCs forecast to sell this year, all in one sales growth is attracting attention.

“We’re expecting Apple to expand its all in one products as well as Window-based PC makers,” said Jon Peddie of John Peddie Research. “PC prices in general have been coming down due to Moore’s Law, and the cost of the displays has been coming down. CPUs and associated components are getting smaller and using less power while delivering more performance, making an all in one not only a good choice, it can be the best choice.”

All in One PCs on Store Shelves

As consumer demand continues to grow at double-digit pace, all in one computers are getting more shelf space next to conventional tower PCs at Costco and other retail stores.

Consumers are seeing a wave of new all in one designs from a host of familiar PC manufacturers. Even Vizio and LG, companies better known for making TVs and home appliances, are jumping in with their own stylish all in one designs.

“We’re putting significant resources behind all in ones,” said Lenovo’s Jun. He says that better processors that run cooler and innovation in LED screens have helped them to make more appealing system designs. “Sales have ramped very quickly,” he said, as Lenovo aims to surpass Apple as the biggest all in one PC seller in the world.

The all in one PC concept has been around for almost two decades, but Apple’s 1998 line of colorful iMacs is often credited with encouraging consumers to move beyond beige box desktop computers. Since then, PC makers have been improving all in one designs, bringing quieter systems nestled behind elegant 20-inch widescreen monitors. They have even evolved into multi-purpose, multi-user devices used for watching TV and movies, or for creating or sharing experiences. The Lenovo A720, for example, comes with an adjustable 27-inch touchscreen that can tilt almost flat, allowing artists to draw or groups of people to play a digital board game.

Manufacturing Benefits, Emerging Markets for All in One PCs

Peddie says that consumers are attracted by new, stylish designs, but they’re also benefiting from manufacturing, inventory and shipping costs savings. He points out that all in ones require only one box rather than the two needed to package a monitor and tower, a double ensemble that has been the norm for desktop computers since the first IBM PC hit the market in 1981.

Touch Concept All in One PC

All-in-one PC designs have been around for more than a decade, like this 'N Touch concept PC designed by Engineering Design Consultants in 2000, equipped with a wireless keyboard and built-in wireless Internet connection.

In addition to manufacturing cost savings, there are new distribution efforts to bring components and system design specs to resellers. This could help smaller computer makers around the world bring their own all in ones to market quickly and revitalize their desktop businesses, according to Intel’s channel VP Steve Dallman.

“We have been working with board manufacturers and original design manufacturers to develop a standard for all in ones,” said Dallman. “In the past, it would have taken nearly 1 hour to build a system, but with new integration and manufacturing specs the time is now less than 20 minutes.” Dallman says that all in ones channel sales have increased about 300 percent since this time last year.

Overseas markets have fueled much of that growth. China has been Lenovo’s fastest-growing region for all in ones PCs, and the company is “seeing hyper growth in Latin America,” said Jun.

“All-in-ones make up about 90 percent of our overall desktop sales there,” he said. “They are popular in Latin America because people have options from very low-entry-level to higher-priced units.” He says Lenovo is seeing strong sales in retail, and fast growth in such emerging markets as Russia and India.

Peddie says the industry is investing in innovative, new features. “The idea of touch on every screen has caught on and next-generation all in one computers will expand to include gesture or natural user interfaces,” he said. “Next innovations in all in ones will be 120Hz screen for S3D (stereo 3D), and voice activation, so an all in one in the kitchen or living room becomes a partner. Envision a person with butter on their hands saying to their computer, ‘Get me the chicken Cordon Bleu recipe.’”

All in Ones Revitalize Desktop PCs

Touchscreens, sleek designs and manufacturing innovations spur demand for all in one PCs.

In a world gone mobile, there’s a growing appetite for stationary computers, and sales of so-called all in one desktop PCs have been climbing by double digits according to market researchers.

Touchscreen All in One PC

Innovations such as large touchscreens as seen on this Lenovo all in one PC are making stationary computers more engaging and multi-functional than traditional desktops.

All in ones, or AIOs, integrate computer components with the display and rely on a single power plug. That’s a contrast to traditional desktop PCs with a separate tower and monitor that connect via cable with each requiring its own power source.

“It’s easy to interact with all in ones because they have more features than tower computers,” said Ouyang Jun, an executive director and GM at Lenovo. “Everything is in front of you.”

Industry experts say the recent rise in demand for all in ones is driven by significant cost savings from manufacturing efficiencies and new, more elegant designs. Many of the latest models include touchscreens that may become even more appealing with the release of the touch-oriented Windows 8 operating system later this year.

“I was in Japan about a week and a half ago and pretty much the entire PC market is converted to all in ones,” said Kirk Skaugen, general manager of Intel’s the PC client group in April. “They’re very thin panels and they’re all over the house, and they have integrated TV. That gets exciting when you look forward to voice and gesture (control).”

An estimated 16.4 million all in ones are expected to sell this year, a 20 percent increase from 2011, according to research firm IHS. While total sales remain a fraction of 132.3 million traditional desktop PCs forecast to sell this year, all in one sales growth is attracting attention.

“We’re expecting Apple to expand its all in one products as well as Window-based PC makers,” said Jon Peddie of John Peddie Research. “PC prices in general have been coming down due to Moore’s Law, and the cost of the displays has been coming down. CPUs and associated components are getting smaller and using less power while delivering more performance, making an all in one not only a good choice, it can be the best choice.”

All in One PCs on Store Shelves

As consumer demand continues to grow at double-digit pace, all in one computers are getting more shelf space next to conventional tower PCs at Costco and other retail stores.

Consumers are seeing a wave of new all in one designs from a host of familiar PC manufacturers. Even Vizio and LG, companies better known for making TVs and home appliances, are jumping in with their own stylish all in one designs.

“We’re putting significant resources behind all in ones,” said Lenovo’s Jun. He says that better processors that run cooler and innovation in LED screens have helped them to make more appealing system designs. “Sales have ramped very quickly,” he said, as Lenovo aims to surpass Apple as the biggest all in one PC seller in the world.

The all in one PC concept has been around for almost two decades, but Apple’s 1998 line of colorful iMacs is often credited with encouraging consumers to move beyond beige box desktop computers. Since then, PC makers have been improving all in one designs, bringing quieter systems nestled behind elegant 20-inch widescreen monitors. They have even evolved into multi-purpose, multi-user devices used for watching TV and movies, or for creating or sharing experiences. The Lenovo A720, for example, comes with an adjustable 27-inch touchscreen that can tilt almost flat, allowing artists to draw or groups of people to play a digital board game.

Manufacturing Benefits, Emerging Markets for All in One PCs

Peddie says that consumers are attracted by new, stylish designs, but they’re also benefiting from manufacturing, inventory and shipping costs savings. He points out that all in ones require only one box rather than the two needed to package a monitor and tower, a double ensemble that has been the norm for desktop computers since the first IBM PC hit the market in 1981.

Touch Concept All in One PC

All-in-one PC designs have been around for more than a decade, like this 'N Touch concept PC designed by Engineering Design Consultants in 2000, equipped with a wireless keyboard and built-in wireless Internet connection.

In addition to manufacturing cost savings, there are new distribution efforts to bring components and system design specs to resellers. This could help smaller computer makers around the world bring their own all in ones to market quickly and revitalize their desktop businesses, according to Intel’s channel VP Steve Dallman.

“We have been working with board manufacturers and original design manufacturers to develop a standard for all in ones,” said Dallman. “In the past, it would have taken nearly 1 hour to build a system, but with new integration and manufacturing specs the time is now less than 20 minutes.” Dallman says that all in ones channel sales have increased about 300 percent since this time last year.

Overseas markets have fueled much of that growth. China has been Lenovo’s fastest-growing region for all in ones PCs, and the company is “seeing hyper growth in Latin America,” said Jun.

“All-in-ones make up about 90 percent of our overall desktop sales there,” he said. “They are popular in Latin America because people have options from very low-entry-level to higher-priced units.” He says Lenovo is seeing strong sales in retail, and fast growth in such emerging markets as Russia and India.

Peddie says the industry is investing in innovative, new features. “The idea of touch on every screen has caught on and next-generation all in one computers will expand to include gesture or natural user interfaces,” he said. “Next innovations in all in ones will be 120Hz screen for S3D (stereo 3D), and voice activation, so an all in one in the kitchen or living room becomes a partner. Envision a person with butter on their hands saying to their computer, ‘Get me the chicken Cordon Bleu recipe.’”