BlackBerry Endangered in the Enterprise?

BYOD program boosts productivity as workers choose their own smartphone.

Once the executive smartphone of choice, the BlackBerry is being pushed aside as BYOD, or “bring your own device” programs, proliferate across large enterprises.

BYOD Android Smartphone User

The findings of a recent survey indicate that the Intel BYOD program, which includes more than 19,000 employees, has led to 2.75 million hours in gained productivity.

Some of these companies are curtailing support for the mobile device once considered so addictive it was dubbed “CrackBerry.” Yahoo CEO Marisa Mayer, in a recent company memo, asserted that using consumer mobile devices would help employees “think and work as the majority of our users do.” The Apple iPhone 5, a variety of Android phones and the Windows Phone 8-powered Nokia Lumia 920 were all identified as devices that Yahoo supports for its employees while the RIM BlackBerry was left out in the cold.

What’s happened at Yahoo is indicative of the impact that BYOD policies are having in the enterprise. At IBM a BYOD program ushered in a wave of non-RIM mobile devices that now outnumber the BlackBerry two to one. At Intel, over the past 2 years the BlackBerry has plummeted from device of choice to the third most popular smartphone. This decline wasn’t prompted by an executive order, but by employees being allowed to choose their own device for the workplace.

BlackBerry Hurt by BYOD?

Intel began officially allowing non-IT issued devices to access secure company email, calendar and documents in 2009. The BYOD program unleashed an onslaught of consumer-designed devices, mostly powered by Apple’s iOS and Android, at a rate that has trumped the once-dominant BlackBerry.

Prior to the BYOD program, BlackBerry was one of a handful of smartphones supported by Intel mobility engineer Derek Harkin and his team. Even after the BYOD program began in 2009, BlackBerry numbers grew steadily and doubled from 5,000 to about 10,000 between 2009 and 2011, according to Harkin. But then growth hit a plateau as employees began bringing in more iPhone and Android devices.

BYOD Usage

After the BYOD program began, BlackBerry numbers grew steadily and doubled from 5,000 in to 10,000 between 2009 and 2010, but plateaued shortly after Intel began supporting the iPhone.

“In 2007 many employees went out on their own and bought iPhones,” said Harkin. “Soon after we began offering employees a hybrid plan where [Intel] pays for service but doesn’t pay for the device. When people can choose, they are choosing other devices over BlackBerry.” He notes that while the number of BlackBerry devices reached 10,000 by the end of 2011, the number of iPhones doubled that year to about 12,000, and Android devices increased from nearly 1,800 to about 5,700.

Just before the release of the iPhone 5 in September, the number of BlackBerry devices had declined to about 9,500 and, by contrast, Intel’s IT department was supporting approximately 17,500 iOS and 9,500 Android devices, according to Harkin. He said that within 16 days after its release, the iPhone 5 accounted for almost 5 percent of the 17,000 Apple BYOD devices. In some areas of the company, especially those operating with sensitive intellectual property, BlackBerry remains one of few smartphone options for employees.

BYOD Boosts Productivity

Harkin’s team supports about 90 percent of today’s popular mobile operating systems. Earlier this year, Intel IT BYOD survey results  indicated that smartphones are helping employees save between 20-30 minutes a day per employee on average, and has led to 2.75 million hours in gained productivity.

Results like that have Harkin and his team keen to evaluate any new mobile OS that hits the market. “Typically after two or three releases of a new OS we can bring them into the enterprise securely,” he said. When a new OS comes out, such as Windows Phone, Harkin says his team can bring it into the enterprise quickly using mobile device management software that creates a protected area inside the device for secure email.

BYOD iPhone

The number of Apple iPhones in the Intel BYOD program doubled in 2011.

The tipping point for BYOD came in mid-2011, according to Harkin. That’s when “BYOD surpassed corporate-issued devices,” he said. “Currently BYOD accounts for 70 percent of the handheld devices managed by Intel IT.” That equates to nearly 26,000 devices in BYOD program so far versus 12,000 IT-issued devices.

“Adoption of BYOD is not driven by groups or departments at Intel,” said Harkin. “It is completely user driven and it is an individual user’s choice to participate in the BYOD program.”

Harkin said that not everyone chooses to participate in the program. Still, the program is adding hundreds of devices each month. “We especially see peaks in growth around holiday times — Thanksgiving, Christmas as people get new devices and want to bring them to work,” said Harkin. One Intel employee has 13 supported devices, and, according to Harkin,  about 2,000 iPads and 300 Android tablets are now owned by employees accessing the Intel network.

“We’re working toward compute continuum, where people can share experiences across different devices, so putting any limits constrains possibilities,” he said. “As a company, we want to be in all devices. Blindness to what’s happening in the market can lead to failure.”

Going forward, Harkin has his team focused on two areas: Providing the best IT support experience on Android-powered phones with Intel inside without neglecting other operating systems and bringing Windows 8 tablets and smartphones into the enterprise.

 
Related stories

BlackBerry Endangered in the Enterprise?

BYOD program boosts productivity as workers choose their own smartphone.

Once the executive smartphone of choice, the BlackBerry is being pushed aside as BYOD, or “bring your own device” programs, proliferate across large enterprises.

BYOD Android Smartphone User

The findings of a recent survey indicate that the Intel BYOD program, which includes more than 19,000 employees, has led to 2.75 million hours in gained productivity.

Some of these companies are curtailing support for the mobile device once considered so addictive it was dubbed “CrackBerry.” Yahoo CEO Marisa Mayer, in a recent company memo, asserted that using consumer mobile devices would help employees “think and work as the majority of our users do.” The Apple iPhone 5, a variety of Android phones and the Windows Phone 8-powered Nokia Lumia 920 were all identified as devices that Yahoo supports for its employees while the RIM BlackBerry was left out in the cold.

What’s happened at Yahoo is indicative of the impact that BYOD policies are having in the enterprise. At IBM a BYOD program ushered in a wave of non-RIM mobile devices that now outnumber the BlackBerry two to one. At Intel, over the past 2 years the BlackBerry has plummeted from device of choice to the third most popular smartphone. This decline wasn’t prompted by an executive order, but by employees being allowed to choose their own device for the workplace.

BlackBerry Hurt by BYOD?

Intel began officially allowing non-IT issued devices to access secure company email, calendar and documents in 2009. The BYOD program unleashed an onslaught of consumer-designed devices, mostly powered by Apple’s iOS and Android, at a rate that has trumped the once-dominant BlackBerry.

Prior to the BYOD program, BlackBerry was one of a handful of smartphones supported by Intel mobility engineer Derek Harkin and his team. Even after the BYOD program began in 2009, BlackBerry numbers grew steadily and doubled from 5,000 to about 10,000 between 2009 and 2011, according to Harkin. But then growth hit a plateau as employees began bringing in more iPhone and Android devices.

BYOD Usage

After the BYOD program began, BlackBerry numbers grew steadily and doubled from 5,000 in to 10,000 between 2009 and 2010, but plateaued shortly after Intel began supporting the iPhone.

“In 2007 many employees went out on their own and bought iPhones,” said Harkin. “Soon after we began offering employees a hybrid plan where [Intel] pays for service but doesn’t pay for the device. When people can choose, they are choosing other devices over BlackBerry.” He notes that while the number of BlackBerry devices reached 10,000 by the end of 2011, the number of iPhones doubled that year to about 12,000, and Android devices increased from nearly 1,800 to about 5,700.

Just before the release of the iPhone 5 in September, the number of BlackBerry devices had declined to about 9,500 and, by contrast, Intel’s IT department was supporting approximately 17,500 iOS and 9,500 Android devices, according to Harkin. He said that within 16 days after its release, the iPhone 5 accounted for almost 5 percent of the 17,000 Apple BYOD devices. In some areas of the company, especially those operating with sensitive intellectual property, BlackBerry remains one of few smartphone options for employees.

BYOD Boosts Productivity

Harkin’s team supports about 90 percent of today’s popular mobile operating systems. Earlier this year, Intel IT BYOD survey results  indicated that smartphones are helping employees save between 20-30 minutes a day per employee on average, and has led to 2.75 million hours in gained productivity.

Results like that have Harkin and his team keen to evaluate any new mobile OS that hits the market. “Typically after two or three releases of a new OS we can bring them into the enterprise securely,” he said. When a new OS comes out, such as Windows Phone, Harkin says his team can bring it into the enterprise quickly using mobile device management software that creates a protected area inside the device for secure email.

BYOD iPhone

The number of Apple iPhones in the Intel BYOD program doubled in 2011.

The tipping point for BYOD came in mid-2011, according to Harkin. That’s when “BYOD surpassed corporate-issued devices,” he said. “Currently BYOD accounts for 70 percent of the handheld devices managed by Intel IT.” That equates to nearly 26,000 devices in BYOD program so far versus 12,000 IT-issued devices.

“Adoption of BYOD is not driven by groups or departments at Intel,” said Harkin. “It is completely user driven and it is an individual user’s choice to participate in the BYOD program.”

Harkin said that not everyone chooses to participate in the program. Still, the program is adding hundreds of devices each month. “We especially see peaks in growth around holiday times — Thanksgiving, Christmas as people get new devices and want to bring them to work,” said Harkin. One Intel employee has 13 supported devices, and, according to Harkin,  about 2,000 iPads and 300 Android tablets are now owned by employees accessing the Intel network.

“We’re working toward compute continuum, where people can share experiences across different devices, so putting any limits constrains possibilities,” he said. “As a company, we want to be in all devices. Blindness to what’s happening in the market can lead to failure.”

Going forward, Harkin has his team focused on two areas: Providing the best IT support experience on Android-powered phones with Intel inside without neglecting other operating systems and bringing Windows 8 tablets and smartphones into the enterprise.

 
Related stories