Father-Son Scavenger Hunt Takes Them Inside Intel

Smartphone ‘Picture of the Day’ project combs the San Francisco Bay Area in search of heart statues from public art project.

Father-Son Scavenger Hunt for Public Art

Lloyd Lee-Lim and his 4-year-old son Ben have been on a technology-aided scavenger hunt to find giant heart statues located throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

What started as a straightforward hunt for a mother’s Valentine’s Day gift has grown into a months-long father and son quest to photograph more than 170 giant hearts from a public art project. Finding the 5-foot tall heart statues isn’t always easy — many are now in private hands — but the pair recently tracked down one of the biggest single collections of the artwork at Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif.

Lloyd Lee-Lim and his 4-year-old son Ben have been on a technology-aided scavenger hunt of sorts that has taken them all over the San Francisco Bay Area.

“I started something called Benjamin’s Picture of the Day where I would send my wife a picture each day so she can see what Ben is up to,” said Lee-Lim, a software developer who worked at UC Berkeley and is now a stay-at-home dad.

A few months after taking the first picture of Ben with a heart statue on Valentine’s Day, father and son had found 42 different hearts. Lee-Lim photographs the hearts with a point-and-shoot camera or more often his smartphone camera so he can quickly email them and post to Flickr.

Sticks and Stones Public Art Statue

"Sticks and Stones," which sits in an internal courtyard where Intel employees meet and eat together.

The heart statues, inspired by Tony Bennett’s song “I Left My Heart in San Francisco,” date back to 2004 when the San Francisco General Hospital Foundation started its “Hearts in San Francisco” public art fundraiser. The hearts, which are designed by local artists funded by corporate and individual sponsorships, have helped the hospital raise millions of dollars for new technologies and supplies for treating Bay Area victims of severe physical trauma. The organization has spotlighted Lee-Lim’s photos on its Facebook page several times.

When it became difficult to find the next heart to photograph, the Lee-Lims turned to Facebook, Google and other online sources for information on the whereabouts of more hearts.

“Social media is extremely important to us … it gives me most of the leads,” said Lee-Lim. “Once you’ve found the obvious hearts, it gets very hard to find others. Many of the hearts we’re looking for now are in corporations like Chevron and Visa or private collections, so we need help in both locating them and obtaining access to them.”

In May, after spotting photos on Instagram and Flickr posted by an Intel employee, Lee-Lim requested a visit to Intel headquarters.

Spaces In Between Public Art Statue

"The Spaces in Between" is a design former Intel CEO Paul Otellini particularly liked because it resembles a circuit board.

“I knew for sure there were at least five hearts inside Intel, but I had a hunch there were more,” said Lloyd Lee-Lim. That hunch paid off with the discovery of a seventh heart, “The Spaces in Between,” a design that former Intel CEO Paul Otellini particularly liked because it resembled a circuit board and would fit well in the cafeteria where engineers meet regularly.

Otellini, a San Francisco native and resident, decided Intel would sponsor one of the first hearts in 2004 and the company has sponsored a heart each year since. The first heart was the striped “City of Love” with Intel Centrino wireless technology inside that brought free public Wi-Fi to San Francisco’s Union Square.

According to Eileen Ovrahim, a facilities manager at Intel, seven hearts are in Santa Clara and one at the company’s Folsom campus. In February 2014, she’s expecting a ninth heart to arrive, which she plans to place in the new Health for Life Center, a clinic currently under construction at Intel headquarters.

Lee-Lim says he’s not quite sure why his son remains excited about the quest except for the fact that he looks forward to doing things together. “When we go hunting for hearts, we typically will also visit a new park or museum in the area, try a new place for lunch, and get some ice cream,” said Lee-Lim.

A self-proclaimed “completionist,” Lee-Lim said, “I believe 176 hearts exist, and we’re going to try to find all of them.”

Father-Son Scavenger Hunt Takes Them Inside Intel

Smartphone ‘Picture of the Day’ project combs the San Francisco Bay Area in search of heart statues from public art project.

Father-Son Scavenger Hunt for Public Art

Lloyd Lee-Lim and his 4-year-old son Ben have been on a technology-aided scavenger hunt to find giant heart statues located throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

What started as a straightforward hunt for a mother’s Valentine’s Day gift has grown into a months-long father and son quest to photograph more than 170 giant hearts from a public art project. Finding the 5-foot tall heart statues isn’t always easy — many are now in private hands — but the pair recently tracked down one of the biggest single collections of the artwork at Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif.

Lloyd Lee-Lim and his 4-year-old son Ben have been on a technology-aided scavenger hunt of sorts that has taken them all over the San Francisco Bay Area.

“I started something called Benjamin’s Picture of the Day where I would send my wife a picture each day so she can see what Ben is up to,” said Lee-Lim, a software developer who worked at UC Berkeley and is now a stay-at-home dad.

A few months after taking the first picture of Ben with a heart statue on Valentine’s Day, father and son had found 42 different hearts. Lee-Lim photographs the hearts with a point-and-shoot camera or more often his smartphone camera so he can quickly email them and post to Flickr.

Sticks and Stones Public Art Statue

"Sticks and Stones," which sits in an internal courtyard where Intel employees meet and eat together.

The heart statues, inspired by Tony Bennett’s song “I Left My Heart in San Francisco,” date back to 2004 when the San Francisco General Hospital Foundation started its “Hearts in San Francisco” public art fundraiser. The hearts, which are designed by local artists funded by corporate and individual sponsorships, have helped the hospital raise millions of dollars for new technologies and supplies for treating Bay Area victims of severe physical trauma. The organization has spotlighted Lee-Lim’s photos on its Facebook page several times.

When it became difficult to find the next heart to photograph, the Lee-Lims turned to Facebook, Google and other online sources for information on the whereabouts of more hearts.

“Social media is extremely important to us … it gives me most of the leads,” said Lee-Lim. “Once you’ve found the obvious hearts, it gets very hard to find others. Many of the hearts we’re looking for now are in corporations like Chevron and Visa or private collections, so we need help in both locating them and obtaining access to them.”

In May, after spotting photos on Instagram and Flickr posted by an Intel employee, Lee-Lim requested a visit to Intel headquarters.

Spaces In Between Public Art Statue

"The Spaces in Between" is a design former Intel CEO Paul Otellini particularly liked because it resembles a circuit board.

“I knew for sure there were at least five hearts inside Intel, but I had a hunch there were more,” said Lloyd Lee-Lim. That hunch paid off with the discovery of a seventh heart, “The Spaces in Between,” a design that former Intel CEO Paul Otellini particularly liked because it resembled a circuit board and would fit well in the cafeteria where engineers meet regularly.

Otellini, a San Francisco native and resident, decided Intel would sponsor one of the first hearts in 2004 and the company has sponsored a heart each year since. The first heart was the striped “City of Love” with Intel Centrino wireless technology inside that brought free public Wi-Fi to San Francisco’s Union Square.

According to Eileen Ovrahim, a facilities manager at Intel, seven hearts are in Santa Clara and one at the company’s Folsom campus. In February 2014, she’s expecting a ninth heart to arrive, which she plans to place in the new Health for Life Center, a clinic currently under construction at Intel headquarters.

Lee-Lim says he’s not quite sure why his son remains excited about the quest except for the fact that he looks forward to doing things together. “When we go hunting for hearts, we typically will also visit a new park or museum in the area, try a new place for lunch, and get some ice cream,” said Lee-Lim.

A self-proclaimed “completionist,” Lee-Lim said, “I believe 176 hearts exist, and we’re going to try to find all of them.”