Intel Career Reaches Back to Different Era

In her 35-year Intel career, Margaret Jesus has experienced business, cultural changes first-hand.

Greater collaboration with business partners, the end of workplace smoking and a shift to more flexible work schedules are just a few of the transformations that a 35-year Intel employee has seen over the course of her career. An increased emphasis on working with other companies has been one of the biggest changes.

Margaret Jesus Intel customer business analyst

Margaret Jesus, a customer business analyst, recently marked her 35th year at Intel.

“My work moved from internal to external over the eight jobs I’ve had,” said Intel customer business analyst Margaret Jesus (pronounced hay-zeus).

Jesus started in materials testing as an inventory control specialist back in 1977. She began her career at the company’s Santa Clara headquarters and transferred to Intel’s then-new Folsom, Calif. campus in 1985.

“When I first started working with the end customers, like HP and Compaq before the merger, they thought Intel was very arrogant,” she said. “They did not like us much at all, but they had to do business with us. Now, they look at us as a business partner.”

The key, she said, was when Intel started taking a “we” approach and working with customers as a team.

“Once both sides began opening up and sharing information, we were able to help each other make better business decisions,” Jesus said.

Relics of Bygone Office Era

The cultural changes she’s seen in the workplace across 4 different decades provide a glimpse into an era when smoking and tightly monitored office hours were standard procedure.

Andy Grove in Intel office early 1970s

Former Intel CEO Andy Grove in his office at the Bowers campus in Santa Clara. While Grove himself did not smoke, Robert Noyce and others did and it was common to see ashtrays in the building.

“The cultural differences between then and now are huge,” said Jesus. “Back then the hours were very firm. You could come in early and stay late, but you had to be at your desk from 8 to 5. If you showed up at 8:15, you’d have to sign a late sheet at security and that report would go to your manager. Because of that some people would use aliases like Marilyn Monroe. I didn’t, but I’d see it on the sheet and security never checked.”

The rigid work hours and monitoring that Jesus recounts stands in sharp contrast to the more flexible work patterns of today’s increasingly mobile workforce.

“Now it’s more relaxed,” she said. “You can work at least one day at home a week and hours are staggered. I now work 5 a.m. to 2 p.m., which works great for my customers in other time zones and my gym time.”

Long before workplace laws prohibited smoking indoors, Jesus, a non-smoker, was subjected to the habits of others, including a former boss.

“I had a manager who would have two cigarettes burning in his cube at the same time,” she said. “He’d swivel one way, take a puff, do some work, then swivel around and take a puff of the other cigarette, do some work. It was constant.”

How times have changed.

“The flexibility of today’s culture, the work-life balance we have now is better to relieve stress,” Jesus said.

A Career Far From Complete

Although she recently passed marked her 35th anniversary milestone, Jesus doesn’t plan to retire anytime soon.

“I’d like to do this at least another 10 years,” she said. “Maybe I can make 50 years here. Intel has been very good to me. I don’t have a college degree, but I’m dedicated, a fast learner, I have patience to train others, I’m good with numbers, I’m analytical and the company let me work my way up. You don’t see a lot of that anymore.”

One thing she has learned during her career with the company was to be more self-assured, a characteristic that didn’t come easy for a woman who used to call herself “the shy person in the corner.”

“I’m not the same person who started at Intel,” said Jesus, who began her Intel career at age 18. “Here you’re trained to take risks, be more aggressive and communicate openly.”

Looking back, Jesus laughs about the extremes she’s heard from the beginning of her Intel career to today.

“When I first started here people would ask, ‘Are you old enough to work here?’ Now they see me and say, ‘You’re still working here?’”

Intel Career Reaches Back to Different Era

In her 35-year Intel career, Margaret Jesus has experienced business, cultural changes first-hand.

Greater collaboration with business partners, the end of workplace smoking and a shift to more flexible work schedules are just a few of the transformations that a 35-year Intel employee has seen over the course of her career. An increased emphasis on working with other companies has been one of the biggest changes.

Margaret Jesus Intel customer business analyst

Margaret Jesus, a customer business analyst, recently marked her 35th year at Intel.

“My work moved from internal to external over the eight jobs I’ve had,” said Intel customer business analyst Margaret Jesus (pronounced hay-zeus).

Jesus started in materials testing as an inventory control specialist back in 1977. She began her career at the company’s Santa Clara headquarters and transferred to Intel’s then-new Folsom, Calif. campus in 1985.

“When I first started working with the end customers, like HP and Compaq before the merger, they thought Intel was very arrogant,” she said. “They did not like us much at all, but they had to do business with us. Now, they look at us as a business partner.”

The key, she said, was when Intel started taking a “we” approach and working with customers as a team.

“Once both sides began opening up and sharing information, we were able to help each other make better business decisions,” Jesus said.

Relics of Bygone Office Era

The cultural changes she’s seen in the workplace across 4 different decades provide a glimpse into an era when smoking and tightly monitored office hours were standard procedure.

Andy Grove in Intel office early 1970s

Former Intel CEO Andy Grove in his office at the Bowers campus in Santa Clara. While Grove himself did not smoke, Robert Noyce and others did and it was common to see ashtrays in the building.

“The cultural differences between then and now are huge,” said Jesus. “Back then the hours were very firm. You could come in early and stay late, but you had to be at your desk from 8 to 5. If you showed up at 8:15, you’d have to sign a late sheet at security and that report would go to your manager. Because of that some people would use aliases like Marilyn Monroe. I didn’t, but I’d see it on the sheet and security never checked.”

The rigid work hours and monitoring that Jesus recounts stands in sharp contrast to the more flexible work patterns of today’s increasingly mobile workforce.

“Now it’s more relaxed,” she said. “You can work at least one day at home a week and hours are staggered. I now work 5 a.m. to 2 p.m., which works great for my customers in other time zones and my gym time.”

Long before workplace laws prohibited smoking indoors, Jesus, a non-smoker, was subjected to the habits of others, including a former boss.

“I had a manager who would have two cigarettes burning in his cube at the same time,” she said. “He’d swivel one way, take a puff, do some work, then swivel around and take a puff of the other cigarette, do some work. It was constant.”

How times have changed.

“The flexibility of today’s culture, the work-life balance we have now is better to relieve stress,” Jesus said.

A Career Far From Complete

Although she recently passed marked her 35th anniversary milestone, Jesus doesn’t plan to retire anytime soon.

“I’d like to do this at least another 10 years,” she said. “Maybe I can make 50 years here. Intel has been very good to me. I don’t have a college degree, but I’m dedicated, a fast learner, I have patience to train others, I’m good with numbers, I’m analytical and the company let me work my way up. You don’t see a lot of that anymore.”

One thing she has learned during her career with the company was to be more self-assured, a characteristic that didn’t come easy for a woman who used to call herself “the shy person in the corner.”

“I’m not the same person who started at Intel,” said Jesus, who began her Intel career at age 18. “Here you’re trained to take risks, be more aggressive and communicate openly.”

Looking back, Jesus laughs about the extremes she’s heard from the beginning of her Intel career to today.

“When I first started here people would ask, ‘Are you old enough to work here?’ Now they see me and say, ‘You’re still working here?’”