Sensors Unwire Heart Monitoring for Cardiac Patients

Wireless sensors promise to reduce rates of cardiac catheterization, other invasive procedures.

Heart patients could visit the hospital less and undergo fewer invasive procedures if doctors can monitor them remotely in real time. Wireless sensors implanted in the body promise to make that possible by sending vital cardiac data directly to healthcare providers. One company is working to bring such medical sensors to market and was recently honored for the innovative technology.

CardioMEMS wireless sensor with quarter

Wireless sensors are implanted to monitor signs of heart failure, aneurysms, hypertension and other severe cardiovascular diseases.

The miniature wireless sensors in the CardioMEMS patient-monitoring platform use microelectromechincal systems, or MEMS technology, to transmit real-time cardiac output, blood pressure readings and critical heart rate data. The sensors are implanted using a minimally invasive technique and have no wires or batteries. Patient data is transmitted using radiofrequency energy, and healthcare providers can access it using an online portal.

“We developed this technology based on the belief that frequent, on-demand, real-time monitoring of vital information enables proactive patient management, which holds the promise of reducing hospitalizations,” said Dr. Jay Yadav, CardioMEMS founder and CEO. “This technology improves a patient’s quality of life and delivers more efficient and cost-effective healthcare.”

The CardioMEMS Champion Heart Failure Monitoring System platform demonstrated a 37 percent reduction in heart failure-related hospitalizations in a 3-year clinical trial that concluded in 2010, according to the company, which estimates a potential annual savings of $8 billion to the U.S. healthcare system.

More recently, the Atlanta-based medical technology company earned the second annual Intel Innovation Award, which recognizes companies developing leading-edge technology to improve healthcare delivery and processes.

CardioMEMS is currently seeking approvals for its monitoring system from the FDA from the U.S. market and CE marking for the European Union.

 
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Sensors Unwire Heart Monitoring for Cardiac Patients

Wireless sensors promise to reduce rates of cardiac catheterization, other invasive procedures.

Heart patients could visit the hospital less and undergo fewer invasive procedures if doctors can monitor them remotely in real time. Wireless sensors implanted in the body promise to make that possible by sending vital cardiac data directly to healthcare providers. One company is working to bring such medical sensors to market and was recently honored for the innovative technology.

CardioMEMS wireless sensor with quarter

Wireless sensors are implanted to monitor signs of heart failure, aneurysms, hypertension and other severe cardiovascular diseases.

The miniature wireless sensors in the CardioMEMS patient-monitoring platform use microelectromechincal systems, or MEMS technology, to transmit real-time cardiac output, blood pressure readings and critical heart rate data. The sensors are implanted using a minimally invasive technique and have no wires or batteries. Patient data is transmitted using radiofrequency energy, and healthcare providers can access it using an online portal.

“We developed this technology based on the belief that frequent, on-demand, real-time monitoring of vital information enables proactive patient management, which holds the promise of reducing hospitalizations,” said Dr. Jay Yadav, CardioMEMS founder and CEO. “This technology improves a patient’s quality of life and delivers more efficient and cost-effective healthcare.”

The CardioMEMS Champion Heart Failure Monitoring System platform demonstrated a 37 percent reduction in heart failure-related hospitalizations in a 3-year clinical trial that concluded in 2010, according to the company, which estimates a potential annual savings of $8 billion to the U.S. healthcare system.

More recently, the Atlanta-based medical technology company earned the second annual Intel Innovation Award, which recognizes companies developing leading-edge technology to improve healthcare delivery and processes.

CardioMEMS is currently seeking approvals for its monitoring system from the FDA from the U.S. market and CE marking for the European Union.

 
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