Something Is Changing at IDF

Hermann Eul on Intel with fashion industry consultant Victoria Molina

‘Soft’ wear has a new look at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco.

Fashion is taking center stage at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, but it’s not what you might expect. There is a curious shift, barely visible but noticeable to some long-time attendees. Things are getting more casual. Not among the throngs of hardware and software developers who aren’t exactly on the cutting-edge of fashion, but among the Intel executives on stage and scurrying around the show from meeting to meeting.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich keynote at IDF13

In the opening-day keynote, new CEO Brian Krzanich wore a blue denim shirt with slacks and rather pedestrian shoes — they looked to be Rockports — that one observer said even looked a bit “scuffed up.” President Renée James wore slacks with a black jacket.

Hermann Eul, head of the Intel Mobile Communications Group and who is often seen in slick tailored suits, bucked the Intel blue and did his keynote in an open-collar golf shirt with a fuchsia sweater — which may have been a first at an IDF — along with jeans and white Converse tennis shoes.

Kirk Skaugen, who leads the PC client group at Intel, lost the jacket he wore at Computex and wore a blue shirt with no tie.

Paul Bergevin, head of the company’s Global Communications Group, was spotted wearing blue suede shoes with black and white striped socks.

Genevieve Bell, who leads the company’s interaction and experience research group, was interviewed by Liz Claman of Fox Business News while wearing a bright, multi-colored kimono fabric wrap.

Hermann Eul keynote at IDF13
And of course, Mike Bell, the guy running Intel’s new devices group, showed up in his trademark Hawaiian shirt — one of his more formal models; black with an embroidered image celebrating Hawaii’s aviation history — and went sockless in boat shoes.

Kari Aakre of the Intel Global Communications Group said that the official dress code for the show is “business casual,” but this year seemed to take that to a new level.

Ironically, fashion industry consultant Victoria Molina donned a black blazer accessorized with a gold necklace when she joined Eul on stage for an online shopping experience demo on the company’s newest Bay Trail tablets announced at the show. She described for the audience how she had worked with Ralph Lauren, Levi’s and Gap … which prompted a chuckle from an audience about as far removed from this week’s New York Fashion Week as you can get.

“Are you laughing because you don’t know who they are?” Molina asked the audience, herself laughing, “Maybe I should say Tommy Bahama?”

Molina demonstrated a virtual shopping experience developed in conjunction with PhiSix Fashion Labs, Master Card and Intel that enables users to create 3D avatars of themselves with actual physical dimensions. This allows people, to see what particular clothes look like using their specific measurements, hairstyle and face. The demo finished with the model’s avatar walking down a catwalk.

Paul Bergevin Intel Global Communications blue suede shoes at IDF13

When Eul said this is “highly demanding on performance and graphics,” the audience again chuckled as if he were referring to the challenges of picking the right outfit. Whereupon Molina said, “He looks really good, I thought for a minute he was on my side of the world.”

As for the technology, Molina said her industry is flat right now, without a lot of compelling new technologies or changes. “We don’t get very excited about much outside of fashion but this is going to revolutionize how we shop online,” she said.

After the keynote, Eul said the fuchsia shirt was an easy decision. He noted that prior to the Intel acquisition of Infineon there was always some mystery around what he would wear on stage. Ironically, he could have wowed the audience even more. “I actually considered white pants to go with it but I stopped short there,” he said.

Molina expressed surprise at Intel’s fashion sense. “Hermann is kind of like the new image,” said Molina, “I did not expect that.” She was impressed by the casual atmosphere and found it enlightening that there were very few suits. She said, “I saw a few sports jackets which is normal, but a lot of denim which is amazing.”

Something Is Changing at IDF

Hermann Eul on Intel with fashion industry consultant Victoria Molina

‘Soft’ wear has a new look at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco.

Fashion is taking center stage at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, but it’s not what you might expect. There is a curious shift, barely visible but noticeable to some long-time attendees. Things are getting more casual. Not among the throngs of hardware and software developers who aren’t exactly on the cutting-edge of fashion, but among the Intel executives on stage and scurrying around the show from meeting to meeting.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich keynote at IDF13

In the opening-day keynote, new CEO Brian Krzanich wore a blue denim shirt with slacks and rather pedestrian shoes — they looked to be Rockports — that one observer said even looked a bit “scuffed up.” President Renée James wore slacks with a black jacket.

Hermann Eul, head of the Intel Mobile Communications Group and who is often seen in slick tailored suits, bucked the Intel blue and did his keynote in an open-collar golf shirt with a fuchsia sweater — which may have been a first at an IDF — along with jeans and white Converse tennis shoes.

Kirk Skaugen, who leads the PC client group at Intel, lost the jacket he wore at Computex and wore a blue shirt with no tie.

Paul Bergevin, head of the company’s Global Communications Group, was spotted wearing blue suede shoes with black and white striped socks.

Genevieve Bell, who leads the company’s interaction and experience research group, was interviewed by Liz Claman of Fox Business News while wearing a bright, multi-colored kimono fabric wrap.

Hermann Eul keynote at IDF13
And of course, Mike Bell, the guy running Intel’s new devices group, showed up in his trademark Hawaiian shirt — one of his more formal models; black with an embroidered image celebrating Hawaii’s aviation history — and went sockless in boat shoes.

Kari Aakre of the Intel Global Communications Group said that the official dress code for the show is “business casual,” but this year seemed to take that to a new level.

Ironically, fashion industry consultant Victoria Molina donned a black blazer accessorized with a gold necklace when she joined Eul on stage for an online shopping experience demo on the company’s newest Bay Trail tablets announced at the show. She described for the audience how she had worked with Ralph Lauren, Levi’s and Gap … which prompted a chuckle from an audience about as far removed from this week’s New York Fashion Week as you can get.

“Are you laughing because you don’t know who they are?” Molina asked the audience, herself laughing, “Maybe I should say Tommy Bahama?”

Molina demonstrated a virtual shopping experience developed in conjunction with PhiSix Fashion Labs, Master Card and Intel that enables users to create 3D avatars of themselves with actual physical dimensions. This allows people, to see what particular clothes look like using their specific measurements, hairstyle and face. The demo finished with the model’s avatar walking down a catwalk.

Paul Bergevin Intel Global Communications blue suede shoes at IDF13

When Eul said this is “highly demanding on performance and graphics,” the audience again chuckled as if he were referring to the challenges of picking the right outfit. Whereupon Molina said, “He looks really good, I thought for a minute he was on my side of the world.”

As for the technology, Molina said her industry is flat right now, without a lot of compelling new technologies or changes. “We don’t get very excited about much outside of fashion but this is going to revolutionize how we shop online,” she said.

After the keynote, Eul said the fuchsia shirt was an easy decision. He noted that prior to the Intel acquisition of Infineon there was always some mystery around what he would wear on stage. Ironically, he could have wowed the audience even more. “I actually considered white pants to go with it but I stopped short there,” he said.

Molina expressed surprise at Intel’s fashion sense. “Hermann is kind of like the new image,” said Molina, “I did not expect that.” She was impressed by the casual atmosphere and found it enlightening that there were very few suits. She said, “I saw a few sports jackets which is normal, but a lot of denim which is amazing.”